Hobonichi Essentials

1 03 2018

A quick rundown of the things that make up my daily Hobonichineeds. We’ve got two pencil boards (this year’s and last years) which I’ve started turning into dashboards including exercise plans (the calendar is a sticky note with calendar template that was in the dollar spot at Target), major monthly to-dos, and decorative stickers and washi scraps. At least one (typically more) washi tape cards. Book darts—these things are fantastically thin, don’t seem to make any marks on the even thinner Tomoe River paper, and help keep track of more spots in the Hobonichi beyond what my two bookmarks can; glad I bought these. Pentel Arts watercolor paints that I put in an Altoid minis tin—these aren’t the most high quality paints out there, but they get the job done and I’ve had no issues with them. Jetstream Multipen, use this guy all the time. Zig Memory System 2 way glue pen, when I want to glue things down rather than affix with washi. Pentel waterbrush, again nothing fancy, gets the job done. A clear-bodied Sailor HighAce Neo Beginner fountain pen, almost always inked with Rohrer & Klingner Scabiosa iron gall ink, which fits perfectly in the pen loops of my Gfeller Casemaker leather Hobonichi cover (they’re rather thin loops; this pen fits best). FriXion pastel highlighter and a FriXion stamp. And a bunch of planner stickers in a Hobonichi folder by hatuca. All of these things here I use constantly as part of my daily journaling, recommend fully, and buy refills/restocks of whenever needed.

Advertisements




Holiday Gift Guide — AND GIVEAWAY!

24 11 2011

It’s just about that time of year, my good people, when all your favorite gift-giving holidays convene. That’s right, such holidays as: my mom’s birthday. My grandmother’s birthday. National Fritters Day. Letter Writing Day. Pepper Pot Day. AND MANY MORE!

You will need to be armed to the teeth with gifts if you hope to make it to the other end of December alive. Personally, I like to do all my shopping from the same location, as far away from humanity as possible, and preferably while sitting. I think you know what that means—online shopping! This post will almost entirely feature items from JetPens; maybe, if I’m feeling particularly industrious, I’ll do another (or more?!) post(s) involving writing utensils from other websites.

And! As promised in the title, there will be a giveaway associated with this post. Details will follow. But first—pens!

I’ll organize this into two major categories—pens I own, and pens I don’t own but am going to recommend anyway—and for the first category, I’ll break it down by price. Let’s begin!

.

Pens I Own

$1 to $10

There are far too many pens in this category to list them all individually. So I’ve compiled a wish list of them on JetPens! And now it can be your wish list.

.

$11 to $30

Pentel Pocket Brush Pen for Calligraphy – $13.50

Great for artists and people who can write in Japanese.

It’s got individual synthetic fiber bristles, and it’s refillable. Can write from a hair-thin line to an I-can’t-be-bothered-to-measure-how-thick broad line. Comes with 2 refills.

.

Uni-ball Alpha Gel Kuru Toga Mechanical Pencil – 0.5mm – $14.00

This has all my favorite things in a mechanical pencil. All of them. Including lead.

Fantastically comfortable Alpha-Gel grip + Kuru Toga lead-rotating mechanism = maybe the best pencil ever? Especially helpful for those who have to take a bunch of scantron tests / handwrite a bunch of essays in pencil. A.k.a. students.

.

Uni-ball Jetstream Alpha Gel Grip Series Ballpoint Pens – 0.7mm – $16.50

There is possibly nothing I can do to make this ballpoint pen better.

Can’t have my favorite mechanical pencil without my favorite ballpoint pen. As an added bonus, I have reviewed this one before! This body takes any size Jetstream retractable refill (I currently have the 0.5mm refill in mine), and also fits the Zebra Sarasa gel refills.

.

Sailor HighAce Neo Beginner’s Fountain Pen – $16.50

Be careful, you're gonna put your eye out with that thing.

I’ve reviewed this one before, too. It’s a nice fine nib pen. Warning: doesn’t come with a refill. I’d advise buying the converter; it’s cheaper than the cartridges, and easier to refill. Warning: I bought the cartridges (which I refill by syringe), but I have not personally tried the converter.

.

Akayashi Sai Watercolor Brush Pen – 5 Color Autumn Set – $17.50

Convenient watercolors? Yes. It can exist.

I would recommend buying these brush pens with the Akashiya Sai Watercolor Mini Pallet ($4.50) and a waterbrush pen like the Kuretake Small Compact Size ($4.25), which actually pushes the total cost of this set up to $26.25, but I think it’s worth it. And the Pentel Pocket Brush Pen works great with these for a watercolor black.

.

J. Herbin Tapered Body Frosted Glass Dip Pen – Large – $20.00

Fun fact: I studied abroad in Venice before my fine pen obsession kicked in. I only bought 1 glass dip pen from Murano. I REGRET THIS VERY STRONGLY.

Impractical, but beautiful. Especially nice for ink enthusiasts (I recommend Noodler’s, which you can get through places like Goldspot Pens or the Goulet Pen Company). Easy to clean; just don’t drop it.

.

Kaweco Classic Sport Fountain Pen – $21.00

Alas, the price has gone up on these since I bought this one. Curse you, modern economy!

From extra-fine nib to broad nib in a variety of colors. Also check out the Kaweco Ice Sport line if you like translucent and bright colors. I have the medium nib, which I find to be one of the thinner mediums I own.

.

Lamy Safari, Vista, and Al-Star Fountain Pens – $26, $26, and $37.50

So the Lamy Al-Star is technically out of this arbitrary price category I decided to sort things by. JUST TRY TO STOP ME!

Colorful, durable, with nibs ranging from extra-fine to broad, and in my experience, they’ve all been wonderful writers. I’d recommend getting the converter with this one, as these pens go well with having a nigh unlimited spectrum of ink colors to choose from. Warning: also recommending the converter because the Lamy takes a special cartridge rather than the standard international short cartridge. The pen is designed so that you just drop the cartridge in and then twist the nib section back onto the barrel; the cartridge then punctures itself. Warning: I’ve never actually tried to shove an international short cartridge into a Lamy, as far as I can remember, so I can’t advise what would happen.

.

Lamy Joy Calligraphy Fountain Pen – $29

Pen is conveniently named to describe what emotion you'll be experiencing while using said pen

Comes with a converter. And a lovely tapered body. And the cap posts on the end! Calligraphy nib options: 1.1mm, 1.5mm, and 1.9mm. Nibs are interchangeable with the regular Lamy nibs, if you just like the body.

.

$30 and up (except for the already mentioned Lamy Al-Star)

A. G. Spalding & Bros. Mini Fountain Pen – Fine Nib – $33.00

Sleek and classy, like a little sci-fi spaceship.

This pen has grown on me a lot more since I first reviewed it, and especially since I started using Rotring Turquoise ink in it (warning: that is a ridiculous price; I paid $4 for my refills at the Art Brown Pen Shop, but they don’t seem to sell that refill online). More of a medium or maybe even broad (what do I know; I never use broad nibs) nib. Warning: do not try to take the clip off or accidentally take the clip off. It comes off, and scratches the satin metal finish in the process. Oops.

.

Kaweco Liliput Al Fountain Pen – $53.00

This is such a disappointingly unsexy picture of a phenomenally sexy pen.

I got the fine nib. Yes, this pen is everything I hoped for, and also more. Yes, I desperately owe you all a proper review of this pen;  I am waiting for the opportunity and the lighting so that I can take the kind of pictures that do this pen justice.  Comes in extra-fine to broad nibs. Takes international short cartridges. Also takes….YOUR HEART.

.

Pilot Prera Clear Body Fountain Pen – $58.00

When I first held this pen, I couldn't leave the store without buying it. And now here we are!

I bought the fine nib, which was a Japanese fine nib—also known as an extra exceptionally fine line nib. Possibly the finest nib I own (too bad I dropped it on the nib (ARGH WHOOPS)). Also comes in medium nib. I’d recommend getting the Pilot Plumix as well (currently cheapest at Target, I believe); the nibs are interchangeable. You (like me) can have a Pilot Prera with an italic nib! Makes your handwriting look even fancier than normal.

.

Pens I Don’t Own

I’m only going to make two recommendations. First, the Uni-ball Jetstream 4&1 4 Color Ballpoint Multi Pen + 0.5mm Pencil ($16.50); I bought one for a friend and he loves it. Four colors of Jetstreams, a pencil, and an eraser all in one body! Second, the Zebra Sharbo X….specifically the Zebra Sharbo X LT3 Pen Body Component – Silver ($49.50). Look at that thing. I want it. Why wouldn’t you?

.

******************************

THE GIVEAWAY!

******************************

Brad at JetPens has generously offered up a $10 JetPens gift card for one lucky commenter on this post! The rules:

  1. Leave one comment on this post any time between now and Sunday, November 27th 12:00 PM Eastern Standard Time. This contest is open to all readers in any country! That includes you, international people!
  2. One winner will be picked at random from the comments section of this post. Just make any kind of comment—but only one comment! Comments in excess of one shall be deleted. The comments will be numbered in the order they are received, i.e. the first comment is #1, the second #2, and so on. The Random Integer Generator at random.org will be used to pick the number of the winner.
  3. I’ll post the contest winner in the evening of Sunday, November 27th (sometime between noon and midnight). Winner will have one week to email me. There’s a link to my email at the top of the right sidebar.

Good luck! And preemptive happiness to your holidays!

.

.

P.S. I should have it set up so comments will post without my having to approve them all moderator-style. But if your comment doesn’t show up right away, that means I didn’t set that up correctly, and your comment will show up when I go through and hit “approve” on all of them. Don’t worry! Or, if you are worried, feel free to email me!





Sailor HighAce Neo Beginner’s Fountain Pen – Steel Nib – Fine – Black Body

25 08 2011

WORD PILES

The Sailor HighAce Neo Beginner’s fountain pen hopped into my shopping cart early on in my burgeoning fountain pen addiction, sometime after I became enchanted by the Sailor Ink Bar. This was among one of the first nice fountain pens I owned.

This is one of the pens I carry around in my zippered padfolio thing when I have job interviews. Fact.

The design is simple but deliciously professional, a nice mix of hard, sturdy resin and metal. The only branding on the pen is on the nib, with the rest of the pen austerely unadorned. The cap snaps securely onto both ends, and gives the pen a nice little weight to it. I like having a little weight on the back end to counterbalance my grip style. Some people might find this back-heavy, but honestly, the cap doesn’t weigh THAT much. It’s a nicely constructed pen—I’ve had it maybe a year now, and it’s still looking good.

One in pen years is practically one hundred in people years

Also, look at that grip, and how there’s almost no ridge between the grip section and the back body of the pen. THAT IS WHAT I LIKE TO SEE! I wish I’d taken a close up of that bit, so then I could post here a slowly zooming in .gif of the grip in a sea of majestic sparkles, set to romantic music or something. Alas, an opportunity missed. Moving on.

Let me break it down for you. Literally.

The one thing I don’t like at all about this pen is the cartridge situation—it doesn’t come with a cartridge, and it doesn’t take the standard short international cartridge. And the Sailor Nano Ink cartridges write a very rich black that will dry up in the pen if not used practically every other day. Go ahead and get a Sailor converter for this pen, or end up like me, syringe-filling old, cleaned out Nano cartridges. I haven’t had any drying out problems once I switched to the Noodler’s Dragon’s Napalm, so I’m blaming it on the ink. Luckily, the feed isn’t difficult to remove and clean, so if you decide, against my advice, to actually use the Sailor Nano ink, at least you know you’ll be able to clean it when the ink inevitably dries up in the pen. Like I said, no such problems with the Noodler’s ink, quite the opposite in fact—the Dragon’s Napalm takes FOREVER to dry on Clairefontaine paper when coming out of this pen. I’m gonna have to try a different ink once I use up this cartridge’s worth…maybe find some Noodler’s quick-drying Bernanke ink?

Nib may also double as shaving or stabbing implement

I love the way this thing writes. This is a true Japanese fine nib, easily on par with any extra fine nib pen I currently own. Now, I’m using this pen almost exclusively on smooth paper, but even in my brief dealings with normal copy paper I’ve had no issues with this pen—no skipping, ink flow is consistent, I can write fast with it, writing is tactile but not scratchy, doesn’t give any resistance that would slow down my writing. Be advised: if you are a fan of broad nibs and don’t particularly care for any nib below a medium, then you’ll probably find this pen to be scratchy. I don’t think it’s scratchy, but one: I like my nibs fine, and two: I can SHOW you what a scratchy fine nib is (COUGH tachikawa comic nib fountain pen G model nib COUGH), and this is not a scratchy nib. It might be close, but I think it comes down on the nonscratchy side of fine.

My thesaurus advises me of acceptable synonyms for fine. So, here's what a true cat's pajamas nib should look like.

This is a good entry-level fountain pen. Slim, nicely made, holds up well, and it’s affordable. A gateway pen, if you will—a bridge from the low & expensive end (pens like the Pilot Petit 1, Pilot Varsity, Sailor Ink Bar, Platinum Preppy) on your way to the incurable addiction of fancy fountain pens with prices upwards of twenty-one McDouble Sandwiches (I assume McDoubles are used as an international unit of currency) and far beyond. Or you can rest sane and easy with some reasonably priced fountain pens, such as the likes of this Sailor HighAce Neo Beginner’s Fountain Pen.

I keep awkwardly trying to cobble together a pun out of "caption" and "cap end" but it just isn't going to happen. I'll spare you. Instead your caption is: GRATUITOUS CLOSE-UP

Sailor HighAce Neo Beginner’s Fountain Pen – Steel Nib – Fine – Black Body at JetPens