Monteverde Poquito Fountain Pen – Chrome

27 03 2014
Top, writing sample with Poquito #1 that did not want to cooperate. Bottom, writing sample with Poquito #2, somewhat more cooperative

Top, writing sample with Poquito #1 that did not want to cooperate. Bottom, writing sample with Poquito #2, somewhat more cooperative

I had a review all ready and done for this pen. Here’s basically the summary of that review: “the last thing you want as a fountain pen user is the indignity and embarrassment of a pen that refuses to write.” No matter what I did, the pen just would not write. The flow was terrible. It would dry out after mere hours of not being used. But the Goulet Pen Company, being awesome, when I contacted them for advice on what to do about the poorly performing Poquito went ahead and sent me another one to exchange. Now, I have a less terrible Poquito to review.

It is certainly compact

It is certainly compact

Appearance-wise, the Poquito is on winning ground, which was what originally attracted me to it. The idea was to get a serious metal-body contender for the pocket fountain pen category at a more affordable price than, say, the twice-as-expensive Liliput. The snap cap won points for convenience, and though the Chrome body picks up hand and fingerprints clear enough to convict a crime, I chose chrome over one of the painted jobs thinking it would hold up better in pockets that might also include keys and other oddments. The cap snaps nicely closed, and posts securely. So far, so good.

Here is where the unmitigated goodness ends

Here is where the unmitigated goodness ends

The writing, however, is on a little shaky ground. As I mentioned, my first Poquito wouldn’t write reliably at all. The second Poquito is doing better, though I still had some problems when I first got it—the pen seemed to dry up overnight, it would need to be scribbled around with before I’d get it writing again.

"Poquito"---Spanish for "little," likely being the general amount of ink you'll be able to coax out of this pen.

“Poquito”—Spanish for “little,” likely being the general amount of ink you’ll be able to coax out of this pen.

But it seems to be writing for now, so let’s evaluate that performance. On the whole, the flow seems a bit dry and also a bit variable. It’s not been so dry as to completely ghost out, but you can see where the ink gets thinner. The nib is neither terrible nor remarkable; it simply is.

Oh Poquito, I had such high hopes for you!

Oh Poquito, I had such high hopes for you!

There are good, reliable compact fountain pens out there, but the Poquito doesn’t top the list. I would probably recommend the too-juicy A.G Spalding & Bros. Mini Fountain Pen over the Poquito (JUST KIDDING I inked up the A.G. Spalding mini and MY GOODNESS IT IS WAY TOO JUICY). If you want a solid way to spend your money, for the same price at The Goulet Pen Company you can get two bottles of Rohrer & Klingner Scabiosa Iron Gall ink, which is pretty much the most magical ink I’ve ever tried (and it will be shipped in the most secure and Fort Knoxian bubblewraptopia of fashions). Or you can take a whirl on the quality control roulette wheel and give the Poquito a try.

Monteverde Poquito Fountain Pen – Chrome – at the Goulet Pen Company

Advertisements

Actions

Information

9 responses

27 03 2014
The Well-Appointed Desk

I got a Poquito and had no issues with ink flow at all. Does it need a more lubricated ink?

As for needing a little priming, after sitting overnight — that isn’t any different from other pens I have in the same $20-$30 price range.

27 03 2014
No Pen Intended

The first Poquito I tried almost every ink possible, no dice—flow would stop literally in the middle of a word. The second Poquito is doing better, but flow still seems variable (I am guessing this ink cartridge the Goulets sent might be Diamine). As for priming, I don’t have any other pens in this price range that require priming after sitting only overnight. Maybe after a week or more unused, but not overnight.

27 03 2014
The Well-Appointed Desk

Do you use higher priced pens in general? I’ll be more aware if which pens need priming. I think my kawecos always do. I find ballpoint pens often need priming too. But maybe that’s a lefty issue.

27 03 2014
No Pen Intended

Just off the top of my head that I have inked now, my Pilot Metropolitan, Pentel Tradio TRF100, Pilot Petit 1 and any cheapo disposables like the Pilot Varsity, Sailor Ink Bar— none of those require priming. My Kaweco Sport sometimes does, but the pricier Liliput doesn’t. From my memory in the $30 or less range, the Schrade Tactical was always ready to go; others I’d need to ink up and test to confirm. Of expensive pens, only the Lamy Dialog 3, if left a few days, would require priming. I’m lefty but I generally overwrite such that the pen almost hits the page at a right-handed angle.

27 03 2014
The Well-Appointed Desk

It definitely sounds like the Poquito itself had some issues. I had a Liliput that was a dud like that too. Would not write for love or money. I received a replacement and it works great. I’ve heard that the lower priced pens are more inclined to be inconsistent since its not as cost effective to test and double check every pen off the assembly line. I do hope you can get your Poquito working properly. Its a nice little pen.

27 03 2014
Michelle Smith

I have a Monteverde Artista, and its flow is also variable. *And* I’ve seen another review of one where the blogger mentioned the same thing. Perhaps it’s a bigger Monteverde issue.

27 03 2014
Shirley Furby

Just received two Lanbitou black minis for which I paid $6.58 with free shipping. I have unpacked and inked one, writes beautifully. You don’t always have to pay a high price. I know some Chinese pens have question qualities. I dropped this one a couple of times, no leakage no problem. Maybe I was lucky this time but it sounds like you were not.

28 03 2014
Penthusiasm!

[…] can read about a disappointing experience with a Monteverde Poquito over at No Pen […]

28 03 2014
penemuel

Ugh – that’s a shame. Fountain pens with flow issues are just as hard to write with as ballpoints that you need to press hard with! (And what IS it with that Spalding? I have one, and the ink practically POURS out…)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: